Moving Away to College and Insurance

There’s a lot to figure out when moving to college and leaving home for the first time. The best way to move to college is to plan ahead and to keep the future move-out in mind, too.  We’re sharing some helpful college tips on how to be successful with your first college housing experience.  If you have any questions, contact our office at 413.475.7283 or Complete our online quote form today!

If Moving Into a Dorm, Student Housing:

  • Students are generally covered by their parent’s home insurance coverage if the student’s property is damaged or stolen. Please just confirm this with your insurance agent to be sure your insurance carrier includes this coverage and the amount of coverage.
  • Keep in mind that the home insurance deductible applies to the damaged and stolen property.
  • Certain valuables may need additional coverage.

If Moving Into Off-campus Housing:

  1. Set up a realistic monthly budget.

Plan:

  • Set up your utilities.
  • Decide who will be in charge of water, electricity, energy, and cable/internet, or if one housemate will be in charge of all of them.
  • Set up Venmo accounts so that you can send the money to roommates if cash or checks are inconvenient.

When you move in:

  • In the kitchen, hang a dry erase board to keep track of who’s paid and who hasn’t each month.
  • Next to that, put a hanging mail organizer to keep the paid and unpaid bills separated and easy to access.
  • Keep the invoices and the receipts once you’ve paid them, just in case.

When you move out:

  • All the bills will have been paid, and you’ll have proof. Everyone will have paid the same amount for the utilities and services that you all shared throughout the year.

 

  1. Discuss rules and regulations with the landlord.

Plan:

  • Pay attention when you’re discussing the lease with your landlord. You’ll want to know what you should expect, which will hopefully be functioning appliances and plumbing.

When you move in:

  • Check to make sure that everything is in working condition. Appliances like dishwashers, stoves and ovens, washers and dryers, and refrigerators should be usable, and the plumbing should be in good shape.
  • Check for mold in the kitchen and bathroom. If you find that anything is wrong upon moving in, call the landlords immediately.

When you move out:

  • With photo proof from when you moved in, you won’t get charged for any damages or issues that you and your housemates didn’t cause. And you’ll get that deposit back, hopefully!

 

  1. Communicate with roommates about big-ticket items.

Plan:

  • By communicating with your housemates in advance, you can avoid unnecessary duplicates of things that can be shared. Talk about the following items.
    • Small kitchen appliances: coffee makers, toasters and microwaves
    • Cleaning and maintenance supplies: vacuums, toilet cleaners/plungers, toolsets, and brooms/swiffers
    • Furniture for shared spaces: kitchen tables and chairs, couches and coffee tables

When you move in:

  • Make lists of what kitchen appliances, dishware, silverware, and utensils; furniture; and cleaning supplies each roommate has brought.

When you move out:

  • Nobody will have spent money on things that were never even used, and there won’t be any confusion over who takes what.

 

  1. Save money on furnishings.

Plan:

  • Spend the summer looking for cheap furniture at thrift stores, yard sales, and your relatives’ attics and basements.

When you move in:

  • Don’t bring your beautiful furniture from home or spend too much money on buying all new stuff.

When you move out:

  • You can decide to donate, toss, or store big items that you don’t feel like transporting without regretting how much you spent on them.

 

  1. Coordinate cleaning efforts to maintain the space.

Plan:

  • Plan on keeping the house clean and functioning.

When you move in:

  • Take time with your housemates to discuss how you’ll work together to keep the house clean.
  • If you all agree on splitting chores or rooms to clean weekly, make a “chore chart.” Vary up who does what on a monthly basis.
  • On the other hand, if you’d rather each do your own chores around the house, make a list of rules (e.g., if you use a dish, wash it; if you have friends over, clean up the mess you make).

When you move out:

  • There won’t be any resentment. None of you will regret living with one another.

 

  1. Insure your belongings with renters insurance.

Renters insurance for college students can help cover the costs to replace or repair their possessions when losses like theft, fire or other covered damage occur. Renters insurance coverage helps protect students from losses in multiple ways. If an accident occurs that keeps a student from being able to live in the dorm or apartment while repairs take place, that student’s renters insurance policy may provide living expenses, such as the costs of meals and temporary housing.

 

Contact one of our agents at contact@encharter.com or call us at (413) 475-7283 today to discuss your renters insurance needs and customize a policy that’s right for you and your student.

 

Chat with an Encharter agent about your insurance today:
413.475.7283
Complete our online quote form

 

Source: https://www.lifestorage.com/blog/moving/moving-away-for-college/

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